Adderall Side Effects For People Who Don’t Need It

Is Adderall Safe For People Who Don’t Need to Take It?

adderall side effects

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If you don’t really need to take it, Adderall side effects can be very serious, because it is technically an amphetamine, a dangerous type of drug for anyone to abuse.

Although very rare, an overdose of Adderall can cause cardiac issues, stroke and death.

The most common side effects people experience when abusing Adderall are not life-threatening. That said, there other side effects that are dangerous and demand immediate medical attention.

Here is a complete list of the side effects you might encounter if you use Adderall without needing it for a medical condition:

Common Side Effects

There are many issues reported by Adderall users that do not normally require medical attention. These include:

  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • dry mouth
  • headache
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • nervousness and restlessness
  • stomach pain
  • insomnia / trouble sleeping
  • unpleasant taste in mouth
  • weakness
  • weight loss.

That said, if any of these problems continue for a long period of time – especially days without sleep or a dangerous amount of weight loss – then you should seek immediate medical attention.

Dangerous Side Effects

Although less frequent, Adderall abuse can cause more severe side effects that require immediate medical attention. These include:

More common

  • bladder pain
  • bloody or cloudy urine
  • difficult, burning, or painful urination
  • fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse
  • frequent urge to urinate
  • lower back or side pain

Less common

  • cold or flu-like symptoms
  • cough or hoarseness
  • fever or chills

Incidence unknown

  • blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty breathing
  • difficulty with speaking
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness
  • double vision
  • faintness
  • headache
  • inability to move the arms, legs, or facial muscles
  • inability to speak
  • itching
  • joint or muscle pain
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet or sexual organs
  • urinary incontinence / loss of bladder control
  • muscle spasm, jerking of extremities
  • nausea
  • pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back, or neck
  • red skin lesions, often with a purple center
  • red, irritated eyes
  • seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there
  • skin rash
  • slow speech
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips
  • sudden loss of consciousness
  • sweating
  • swelling of the feet or lower legs
  • tightness in the chest
  • troubled breathing
  • uncontrolled repeated movements / tics
  • uncontrolled vocal outbursts
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • wheezing

Long-Term Effects

If a person who does not need Adderall takes high doses over a long period of time, then serious cardiovascular issues can occur including stroke from overdosing.

Mental Health Issues

adderall withdrawal depression man

Adderall abuse is also associated with both short- and long-term mental health issues.

Insomnia is a common problem for Adderall users. Because the drug reduces the need for sleep in many people, psychotic breaks and hallucinations are possible after prolonged bouts of sleeplessness. Psychotic breaks are extremely dangerous and demand immediate medical attention.

There have also been reports of long term, persistent mental health issues, including: depression, paranoia, hostile behavior and anti-social behavior lasting for years after prolonged use of the drug.

What It Feels Like To Abuse Adderall

If you don’t use Adderall, this 8-minute clip of user interviews explains everything you need to know:

Is Adderall Addictive?

Many students and young adults believe there is little to no risk of getting addicted to Adderall.

But this is clearly not the case.

Medical research shows that Adderall can be extremely addictive, especially if it is used regularly over a prolonged period of time.

Not only is it mentally addictive, serious and sometimes dangerous withdrawal symptoms can occur for users who abuse Adderall for many months, then stop abruptly. This is why it’s a good idea to get professional help when trying to quit taking Adderall.


Is Adderall Addiction Ruining Your Life?

If you or a loved one are addicted to Adderall and need to quit, then call our hotline at (866)938-6233 to learn about the treatment options available to you.

What's Your Story?

If you have experience with Adderall abuse and are willing to share your story, your words can provide support and encouragement for others who are suffering right now.